This Is Why Socrates Hated Democracy

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Socrates, says Alain de Botton in the School of Life video below, “was portrayed in the dialogues of Plato as hugely pessimistic about the whole business of democracy.” In the ideal society Socrates constructs in the Republic, he famously argues for restricted freedom of movement, strict censorship according to moralistic civic virtues, and a guardian soldier class and the rule of philosopher kings.

In Book VI, Socrates points out the “flaws of democracy by comparing a society to a ship.” If you were going on a sea voyage, “who would you ideally want deciding who was in charge of the vessel, just anyone, or people educated in the rules and demands of seafaring?” Unless we wish to be obtusely contrarian, we must invariably answer the latter, as does Socrates’ interlocutor Adeimantus. Why then should just any of us, without regard to level of skill, experience, or education, be allowed to select the rulers of a country?

The grim irony of Socrates’ skepticism, de Botton observes, is that he himself was put to death after a vote by 500 Athenians. Rather than the typical elitism of purely aristocratic thinking, however, Socrates insisted that “only those who had thought about issues rationally and deeply should be let near a vote.” Says de Botton, “We have forgotten this distinction between an intellectual democracy and a democracy by birthright. We have given the vote to all without connecting it to wisdom.”

Watch the video here:

For Socrates, so-called “birthright democracy” was inevitably susceptible to demagoguery. Socrates “knew how easily people seeking election could exploit our desire for easy answers” by telling us what we wanted to hear. We should heed Socrates’ warnings against mob rule and the dangers of demagoguery, de Botton argues, and consider democracy as “something that is only ever as good as the education system that surrounds it.” It’s a potent idea, and one often repeated with reference to a similar warning from Thomas Jefferson.

So to summarize , we need to have an ‘Intellectual Democracy” not just any old Democracy where anyone can vote. There need to bee Philosophers, Scientists, Teachers and other skilled thinkers at the helm not corporations and clever politicians who are able to control and fool the masses using media and other powers of persuasion.

I have to say I think some of the ideas suggested by Socrates are definitely worth looking into.

Kash Khan – EIC Founder

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Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the founder of Educate Inspire Change (EIC). Since 2012 he has focused on on inspiring and educating others in order to improve their consciousness and connect to their true selves.

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Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the creator of Educate Inspire Change(EIC). He founded EIC in 2012 to help keep people informed, to encourage people to expand their consciousness and to inspire people to reach for their dreams.
Since 2019 he has been going through the most transformative period of his life working with Sacred Plant Medicines out of Costa Rica and is now focusing much more on creating conscious content with the sole purpose of giving people more self-awareness so that they can heal mind, body & spirit and live a full life of meaning and purpose.

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