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Australia Air-Drops Up to 5,000 Pounds of Vegetables to Feed Fire-Stricken & Starving Wildlife in Australia

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Australia Air-Drop Fire

The New South Wales (NSW) government recently launched “Operation Rock Wallaby” to counteract irreversible damage affecting the livelihood of Australia’s at-risk marsupial population. Australian aircrafts continue to drop vegetables to feed thousands of starving animals. This is the first, out of many, attempts to provide nourishment for the innocent and endangered.

Surviving the Aftermath

Australia Helicopter

Up to 5,000 pounds of vegetables have been delivered across the continent. For example, Yengo National Park, Oxley Wild Rivers, and Kangaroo Valley to name a few.

“The wallabies typically survive the fire itself, but are then left stranded with limited natural food as the fire takes out the vegetation around their rocky habitat,” explains NSW Environment Minister Matt Kean.

The lives lost threaten to cross a tipping-point on a continent where 87 percent of wildlife is exclusive to Australia (i.e., kangaroos).

“The wallabies were already under stress from the ongoing drought making survival challenging for the wallabies without assistance,” he continues.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, approximately 1.25 billion animals have died either directly or indirectly from the bushfires across Australia.

Recovery Efforts Set to Continue with a Follow Up

Feeding Australia

Animals Australia, an organization feeding starving animals affected by the fire, runs by donation. They have received generous amounts to lease aircraft and fill bags with grains to deliver below. Once the skies cleared from smoke pollution, missions were made possible.

“With roads likely shut for weeks, the risk of starvation for surviving wildlife in the area is very real,” says Lynn White, Animals Australia spokeswoman. “It would be tragic if there was a further loss of life because the needs of surviving animals was not being met.”

The NSW continues to provide food throughout afflicted areas with plans to follow up on recovery afterward. Kean adds, “When we can, we are also setting up cameras to monitor the uptake of the food and the number of variety of animals there.”

 

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