The Japanese yosegi art of gluing colored wood and cutting it into thin sheets for decoration

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I love learning about new art forms… and I especially love anything artistic from the middle east.

Instead of using paint, Japanese Yosegi decorations are made out of natural fine grains and textures of wood. First, timbers are cut into rods of desired sections, the rods are then glued together to form a section of geometrical design pattern. The surface is sliced into thin plates of wood, which are glued onto boxes and other handicraft works. This mosaic-like art originated during Japan’s Edo Period (17th-19th century) and are still respected all over the world.

Check out some cool videos below to learn more about this amazing art form:

See a master at work, starting from the original blocks of wood to the creation of a mosaic so fine, it’s applied like paper.

You can find out more about the art of Yosegi-zaiku  here.

Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the founder of Educate Inspire Change (EIC). Since 2012 he has focused on on inspiring and educating others in order to improve their consciousness and connect to their true selves.

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Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the creator of Educate Inspire Change(EIC). He founded EIC in 2012 to help keep people informed, to encourage people to expand their consciousness and to inspire people to reach for their dreams.
Since 2019 he has been going through the most transformative period of his life working with Sacred Plant Medicines out of Costa Rica and is now focusing much more on creating conscious content with the sole purpose of giving people more self-awareness so that they can heal mind, body & spirit and live a full life of meaning and purpose.

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