4 Buddhist Monks Habits That Are Hard to Adopt But Will Change Your Life Forever

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Ever wondered how Buddhist Monks live and what habits they adopt to make them so peaceful?

I’ve been always been fascinated by this question so I did some research and this is what I found. Don’t worry, none of these habits are out of the ordinary. We all can adopt them too!

Habit 1 – Outer decluttering

Did you know that the Buddha was born a prince? Yep, he could of spent his life in a big, beautiful palace where everything is done for him.

But he didn’t.

He abandoned everything when he realized the frustrating nature of materialism.

2300 years later, Buddhist monks do the same. They keep material possessions to a minimum and only hold what actually need to live their life. Usually this will all fit in a small backpack.

They completely declutter their life.

Habit 2 – Inner decluttering: taking care of others

In many Buddhist circles, monks learn to do things not for themselves, but for the whole world.

When they meditate, it’s for the sake of everyone. They attempt to attain enlightenment to reach their full potential and help those in need.

When you can develop this kind of selfless attitude, you focus less on your personal problems. You get less emotional about small things and your mind becomes more calm.

This is what’s called inner decluttering: making room for others and dumping selfish habits.

Habit 3 – Meditating A LOT

One of the main reasons you become a monk is to have more time to meditate. Most monks wake up early and meditate for 1 to 3 hours and do the same at night. This kind of practice changes the brain. If you’ve read any articles on the benefits of meditation, then you know what I mean.

You don’t have to adopt this kind of rigorous schedule, but what if you started the day with 30 minutes of meditation?

Habit 4 – Following the wise

In western society, we tend to have an unhealthy relationship with old age. But for Buddhist monks, they see elder people as having wisdom. They seek elder spiritual guides that can help them on their path.

If you look around, there are always insightful people to learn from. Older people generally have more experience which means they can offer countless life lessons.

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Originally published on The Power of Ideas.

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Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the founder of Educate Inspire Change (EIC). Since 2012 he has focused on on inspiring and educating others in order to improve their consciousness and connect to their true selves.

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Kash Khan

Kash Khan

Kash Khan is the creator of Educate Inspire Change(EIC). He founded EIC in 2012 to help keep people informed, to encourage people to expand their consciousness and to inspire people to reach for their dreams.
Since 2019 he has been going through the most transformative period of his life working with Sacred Plant Medicines out of Costa Rica and is now focusing much more on creating conscious content with the sole purpose of giving people more self-awareness so that they can heal mind, body & spirit and live a full life of meaning and purpose.

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