4 Exercises from Positive Psychology to Boost Your Happiness

All of us have experienced times when a dark cloud just seems to be following us around. No matter what you do, it just seems that you can’t seem to shake off that feeling of negativity.

While we don’t want to minimize the value of medication for those who experience this on a daily basis, UCLA neuroscientist Alex Korb, author of The Upward Spiral: Using Neuroscience to Reverse the Course of Depression, One Small Change at a Time, has some handy insights from neuroscience that may help us feel genuinely positive and happy.

1) Get Your Brain’s Attention

It might surprise you, but your brain isn’t exactly helpful when it comes to making you feel good. If you’re experiencing guilt or shame, your brain may be trying to activate its reward center.

While that may sound weird, Korb explains:

“Despite their differences, pride, shame, and guilt all activate similar neural circuits, including the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula, and the nucleus accumbens. This explains why it can be so appealing to heap guilt and shame on ourselves — they’re activating the brain’s reward center.“

This can also occur if you can’t stop worrying.

Korb says that “worrying stimulates the medial prefrontal cortex and lowers activity in the amygdala, thus helping your limbic system, your emotions, remain copascetic.”

So what you can do about this?

Korb suggests asking yourself: “What am I grateful for?” His reasoning is chemical: “One powerful effect of gratitude is that it can boost serotonin. Trying to think of things you are grateful for forces you to focus on the positive aspects of your life. This simple act increases serotonin production in the anterior cingulate cortex.”

2) Label your emotions

If you’re feeling down, try to get specific. Why are you feeling down? What exactly are you feeling? Neuroscience has found that simply labelling your emotions actually defuses them.

Author David Rock’s book Your Brain at Work: Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus, and Working Smarter All Day Long explains:

“To reduce arousal, you need to use just a few words to describe an emotion, and ideally use symbolic language, which means using indirect metaphors, metrics, and simplifications of your experience. This requires you to activate your prefrontal cortex, which reduces the arousal in the limbic system. Here’s the bottom line: describe an emotion in just a word or two, and it helps reduce the emotion.”

3) You’re not perfect, none of us are

A big reason a lot of us can feel anxious and worried is that we feel we’re not perfect. However, the key is to let go the need for perfection, and to be okay with being “good enough”, especially when it comes to making your decisions. As Korb says:

“Trying for the best, instead of good enough, brings too much emotional ventromedial prefrontal activity into the decision-making process. In contrast, recognizing that good enough is good enough activates more dorsolateral prefrontal areas, which helps you feel more in control …” Korb: “Actively choosing caused changes in attention circuits and in how the participants felt about the action, and it increased rewarding dopamine activity. Making decisions includes creating intentions and setting goals — all three are part of the same neural circuitry and engage the prefrontal cortex in a positive way, reducing worry and anxiety. Making decisions also helps overcome striatum activity, which usually pulls you toward negative impulses and routines. Finally, making decisions changes your perception of the world — finding solutions to your problems and calming the limbic system.”

4) The power of touch

Before we go further, you should only be touching others who want to be touch. Okay?

According to Korb,

“A hug, especially a long one, releases a neurotransmitter and hormone oxytocin, which reduces the reactivity of the amygdala.”

Hand holding, pats on the back, and handshakes work, too. Korb cites a study in which subjects whose hands were held by their partners experienced a reduced level of anxiety while waiting for an expected electrical shock from researchers. “The brain showed reduced activation in both the anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex — that is, less activity in the pain and worrying circuits.”

Originally published on The Power of Ideas.

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